RNA Splicing

RNA Splicing part 1


Here is the link to that same
video which is presented by Cold Spring Harbor Lab, where I used to work years ago and where some of the work I discussed today was done.

Two benefits of splicing


While no one believes that RNA splicing evolved
because of these benefits, these are real benefits organisms now enjoy because of it.
  1. Alternative splicing: Not all the exons are included when splicing of specific mRNAs takes place. Different versions of the mRNA may be formed. In the example I gave earlier, exons 1, 3, and 4 could all be joined up in sequence, or, all 4 could be linked. This results in different versions of the protein, with different functions. The domain structure of proteins makes this possible. NOTE: you do not alter the order of the exons when this is done
  2. Exon shuffling: Also because of the domain structure of proteins, it is possible to add exons to genes via recombination and create different versions of the protein. Any chunk of DNA that has portions of introns on its ends that then is recombined (at the DNA level) into another intron will do no damage to an existing gene (It can be spliced out at the mRNA level). But, it also provides the possibility, through alternative splicing, to evolve proteins with new functions.
Key words:
Spliceosome: (there’s a good descriptive name) It’s the assembly of proteins and RNA that carry out splicing.
snRNPs (pronounced “snurps”). These are “small nuclear ribonuclear proteins.” They are the components of the spliceosome.
snRNAs: small nuclear RNAs are the main catalytic components. It is the RNA that carries out the reaction. They have names like “U1,” and “U2.” etc.


Self Splicing:
The story about how RNAs got spliced became more obvious when self-splicing RNAs were found. I mentioned these today.
The general reaction looks like this:
Splicing
There are two, successive trans esterification reactions that occur in a concerted way and use energy from an additional GTP that is brought in by the complex. The first takes a branch point sequence near the 3' end of the intron. The 2' OH of that branch point attacks the 5' exon/intron boundary. This splices the intron into a lariat and frees the 3' end of the exon, which then attack the 5' end of the next exon, resulting in the spliced exons and a lariat structure of the intron.
In the self-splicing form, “internal guide sequences” form base-paired structures that hold the players together and facilitate the attacks (which usually involve that 2' OH in an intermediate).
You can see below how the stem-loop structures formed using base pairs, then can fold into three-dimensional structures, facilitating catalysis. Yes, I know, it should have been obvious.

Self3

You can see how the base pairing can be used to bring the active sites together in more detail here. By the way, these last two images are used without permission. The one below is from the Molecule of the Month blog/discussion and the one above is from Trends in Ecology and Evolution.
Closeup

Normal mRNA splicing (non self-splicing)


The story is not all that different in the splicing of mRNA. There are guide sequences and a branch-point lariat. The chemistry varies a little as to who attacks whom when and where. But, the main difference is that the sequence of the intron is not that important for the structure to work. Instead of the intron folding into a complex structure, the separate RNAs in the snRNPs form those structures and then bind the specific sequences in the intron and at the intron-exon borders.